Computing stuff tied to the physical world

JeeNode Experimenter’s Pack

In AVR, Hardware on Nov 8, 2010 at 00:01

Neat – it looks like JeeNodes are starting to become popular for workshops!

I’m not really surprised: it’s more fun than an Arduino, IMO, because you get to learn the basics of electronics and soldering, and of course every JeeNode comes with wireless connectivity built-in. As I’ve said before, making things happen by wireless is a bit like magic…

FWIW, there are a couple of workshops scheduled for this month (“in-house”, i.e. for a specific audience, and I’m only indirectly involved), all are based on either a JeeNode or an RBBB. Both are well suited for solderless breadboards, which – if you ask me – is one of the greatest inventions ever for tinkering and learning electronics. Sure, soldering works best when the circuit is known and proven, but nothing beats a breadboard, some jumper wires, and a bunch of components and chips to try out things!

This gives me great satisfaction. No, not for the money side of it (it’s all discounted anyway), but because I find nothing more exciting than to see people try out new fun stuff and nurture their tech geek sides :)

Learning is great: if you’re young, it’ll make you wiser – if you’re old, it’ll make you younger … (and it’s fun!)

The big question is always: “what do I need to get started?” – and my answer is usually: “it depends on what kind of adventure you’re after”.

I’ve come up with a new “JeeNode Experimenter’s Pack” to create a baseline for the future. That way, it will be easier for me to set up and document my experiments, knowing that there is a common baseline on which to build. It’s also the logical step after this rubber-band concoction. It consists of the following key components:

Dsc 2221

In prose:

In addition, and only in combination with the rest of the Experimenter’s Pack, I’m throwing in a little 10×17 cm laser-cut wooden base and an LDR to get started with some sensor experiments:

Dsc 2220

The base turns the whole thing into a self-contained “project platform” for all sorts of experimentation. And the AA Power Board will supply 3.3V to make this setup portable and usable anywhere. The rest of the empty space is all yours. That’s where the fun happens :)

The AA Power Board is not just a gimmick, BTW: an AA battery will actually provide more power @ 3.3V than a 9V “block”! As someone pointed out recently, it’s also a great way to drain any half-used AA batteries you might still have lying around (who hasn’t?).

Here’s a recent example of use (which required a bit more power, so I hooked it up to a 12V supply):

Dsc 2215

It’s a little stepper motor tester (using an EasyDriver board). Nothing fancy, but it was a convenient way for me to try something like this out. That project board has now been cleared to make room for new experiments…

That’s the whole point, really – this self-contained setup is intended to provide a quick path for trying out new ideas. USB-connected or battery-powered, serial or wireless, local or remote, whatever.

Once it all works, you could:

  1. take the design and redo it as a more permanently soldered circuit
  2. design a pcb for it (which is what I did for the graphics board)
  3. put it all into a custom enclosure and keep using the setup
  4. stash it all away as is, for some other time
  5. put hot glue on it? (yikes!)

I’ve added this to the shop, as 1- and as 10-pack.

  1. I wonder if you have other ports still “functional” with eazydriver? I have similar idea but want to have lcd, relay and temp sensor hooked up as well.

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